Early Greek Philosophy by John Burnet, with Burnet's notes

Section Index


INTRODUCTION

  1. The Cosmological Character of Early Greek Philosophy
  2. The Traditional View of the World
  3. Homer
  4. Hesiod
  5. Cosmogony
  6. General Characteristcs of Greek Cosmology
  7. Phusis
 
  1. Motion and Rest
  2. The Secular Character of Ionian Science
  3. Alleged Oriental Origin of Philosophy
  4. Egyptian Mathematics
  5. Babylonian Astronomy
  6. The Scientific Chracter of the Early Greek Cosmology
  7. Schools of Philosophy

NOTE ON THE SOURCES

A. PHILOSOPHERS
  1. Plato
  2. Aristotle
  3. Stoics
  4. Skeptics
  5. Neoplatonists
B. DOXOGRAPHERS
  1. The Doxographi Graeci
  2. The "Opinions" of Theophrastus
  3. Doxographers
    I. DOXOGRAPHERS PROPER
  1. The Placita and Stobaeus
  2. Aetios
  3. The Vetusta Placita
  4. Cicero
 
    II. BIOGRAPHICAL DOXOGRAPHERS
  1. Hippolytus
  2. The Stromateis
  3. "Diogenes Laertios"
  4. Patristic Doxographies
C. BIOGRAPHERS
  1. Successions
  2. Hermippos
  3. Satyros
  4. "Diogenes Laertios"
D. CHRONOLOGISTS
  1. Eratosthenes and Apollodoros

CHAPTER I. THE MILESIAN SCHOOL

  1. Miletus and Lydia
  2. Origin
  3. The Eclipse Foretold by Thales
  4. Date of Thales
  5. Thales in Egypt
  6. Thales and Geometry
  7. Thales as a Politician
  8. Uncertain Character of the Tradition
  9. The Cosmology of Thales
  10. Water
  11. Theology
  12. The Life of Anaximander
  13. Theophrastus on Anaximander's Theory of the Primary Substance
  14. The Primary Substance is Not One of the Elements
  15. Aristotle's Account of the Theory
 
  1. The Primary Substance is Infinite
  2. The Innumerable Worlds
  3. "Eternal Motion" and the Dinê
  4. Origin of the Heavenly Bodies
  5. Earth and Sea
  6. The Heavenly Bodies
  7. Animals
  8. The Life of Anaximenes
  9. His Book
  10. Theory of the Primary Substances
  11. Rarefaction and Condensation
  12. Air
  13. The World Breathes
  14. The Parts of the World
  15. Innumerable Worlds
  16. Influence of Anaximenes

CHAPTER II. SCIENCE AND RELIGION

  1. Ionia and the West
  2. The Delian Religion
  3. Orphicism
  4. Philosophy as a Way of Life
  5. Relation of Religion and Philosophy
  6. Character of the Tradition
  7. Life of Pythagoras
  8. The Order
  9. Downfall of the Order
  10. Want of Evidence as to the Teaching of Pythagoras
  11. Transmigration
  12. Abstinence
  13. Akousmata
  14. Pythagoras as a Man of Science
  15. Arithmetic
 
  1. The Figures
  2. Triangular, Square and Oblong Numbers
  3. Geometry and Harmonics
  4. Incommensurability
  5. Proportion and Harmony
  6. Things Are Numbers
  7. Cosmology
  8. The Heavenly Bodies
  9. Life of Xenophanes
  10. Poems
  11. The Fragments
  12. The Heavenly Bodies
  13. Earth and Water
  14. Finite or Infinite
  15. God and the World
  16. Monotheism or Polytheism

CHAPTER III. HERAKLEITOS OF EPHESOS

  1. Life of Herakleitos
  2. His Book
  3. The Fragments
  4. The Doxographical Tradition
  5. The Discovery of Herakleitos
  6. The One and the Many
  7. Fire
  8. Flux
  9. The Upward and Downward Path
  10. Measure for Measure
  11. Man
 
  1. Sleeping and Waking
  2. Life and Death
  3. The Day and the Year
  4. The Great Year
  5. Did Herakleitos Teach a General Conflagration?
  6. Strife and "Harmony"
  7. Correlation of Opposites
  8. The Wise
  9. Theology
  10. Ethics of Herakleitos

CHAPTER IV. PARMENIDES OF ELEA

  1. Life of Parmenides
  2. The Poem
  3. "It Is"
  4. The Method of Parmenides
  5. Parmenides, the Father of Materialism
  6. General Characteristcs of Greek Cosmology
  7. The Beliefs of "Mortals"
 
  1. The Dualist Cosmology
  2. The Heavenly Bodies
  3. The Stephanae
  4. The Goddess
  5. Physiology
  6. Alcmaeon of Croton

CHAPTER V. EMPEDOKLES OF AKRAGAS

  1. Pluralism
  2. Date of Empedocles
  3. Empedocles as a Politician
  4. Empedocles as a Religious Teacher
  5. Rhetoric and Medicine
  6. Relation to Predecessors
  7. Death
  8. Writings
  9. The Remains
  10. Empedocles and Parmenides
  11. The "Four Roots"
  12. Strife and Love
 
  1. Mixture and Separation
  2. The Four Periods
  3. Our World the Work of Strife
  4. Formation of the World by Strife
  5. The Sun, Moon, Stars, and Earth
  6. Organic Combinations
  7. Plants
  8. Evolution of Animals
  9. Physiology
  10. Perception
  11. Theology and Religion

CHAPTER VI. ANAXAGORAS OF KLAZOMENAI

  1. Date
  2. Early Life
  3. Relation to the Ionic School
  4. Anaxagoras at Athens
  5. The Trial
  6. Writings
  7. The Fragments
  8. Anaxagoras and His Predecessors
  9. "Everything in Everything"
 
  1. The Portions
  2. Seeds
  3. "All Things Together"
  4. Nous
  5. Formation of the Worlds
  6. Innumerable Worlds
  7. Cosmology
  8. Biology
  9. Perception

CHAPTER VII. THE PYTHAGOREANS

  1. The Pythagorean School
  2. Philolaus
  3. Plato and the Pythagoreans
  4. The "Fragments of Philolaus"
  5. The Problem
  6. Aristotle on the Numbers
  7. The Elements of Numbers
  8. The Numbers Spatial
 
  1. The Numbers as Magnitudes
  2. The Numbers and the Elements
  3. The Dodecahedron
  4. The Soul a "Harmony"
  5. The Central Fire
  6. The Antichthon
  7. The Harmony of the Spheres
  8. Things Likenesses of Numbers

CHAPTER VIII. THE YOUNGER ELEATICS

  1. Relation to Predecessors
  2. Life of Zeno
  3. Writings
  4. Dialectic
  5. Zeno and Pythagoreanism
  6. What Is the Unit?
  7. The Fragments
  8. The Unit
  9. Space
 
  1. Motion
  2. Life of Melissus
  3. The Fragments
  4. Theory of Reality
  5. Reality Spatially Infinite
  6. Opposition to Ionians
  7. Opposition to Pythagoreans
  8. Opposition to Anaxagoras

CHAPTER IX. LEUKIPPOS OF MILETOS

  1. Leucippus and Democritus
  2. Theophrastus on the Atomic Theory
  3. Leucippus and the Eleatics
  4. Atoms
  5. The Void
  6. Cosmology
  7. Relation to Ionic Cosmology
 
  1. The Eternal Motion
  2. The Weight of the Atoms
  3. The Vortex
  4. The Earth and the Heavenly Bodies
  5. Perception
  6. Importance of Leucippus

CHAPTER X. ECLECTICISM AND REACTION

  1. The "Bankruptcy of Science"
  2. Moisture
  3. Date of Diogenes of Apollonia
  4. Writings
  5. The Fragments
 
  1. Cosmology
  2. Animals and Plants
  3. Anaxagoreans
  4. Cosmology
  5. Conclusion







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