Early Greek Philosophy by John Burnet, with Burnet's notes
88. Parmenides, the Father of Materialism 90. The Beliefs of "Mortals"

From Chapter IV., Parmenides of Elea

89. Parmenides, the Father of Materialism
To sum up. What is, is a finite, spherical, motionless corporeal plenum, and there is nothing beyond it. The appearances of multiplicity and motion, empty space and time, are illusions. We see from this that the primary substance of which the early cosmologists were in search has now become a sort of "thing in itself." It never quite lost this character again. What appears later as the elements of Empedokles, the so-called "homoeomeries" of Anaxagoras and the atoms of Leukippos and Demokritos, is just the Parmenidean "being." Parmenides is not, as some have said, the "father of idealism"; on the contrary, all materialism depends on his view of reality.








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