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  Index

I. Preliminary Remarks on the Period, etc.

The members (kôla); their appropriate length ... §§1-8
The phrase (komma) ... §9
The period ... 10, 11 ff.
The periodic and the disjointed style.
        Number of members in a period ... §§12-18.
        The historical period ... §19.
        The rhetorical period ... §20.
        The conversational period ... §21.
        Periods formed of contrasting members ... §§22-24.
        Symmetrical members ... §25.
        Members with similar endings (homoioteleuta) ... §§26-29.
        The enthymeme; how it differs from the period ... §§30-33.
        The member as defined by Aristotle and Archedemus ... §§34-35.

II. The Elevated Style

The four types of style: plain, elevated , elegant and forcible ... §§36-37.
The elevated style (charactêr megaloprepês):
Elevation in composition or arrangements ... §§38-74.
        Figures of speech ... §§59-67.
        Hiatus ... §§68-74.
Elevation in subject matter ... §§75-76.
Elevation in diction ... §§77-113.
        Metaphor ... §§78-88.
        Simili ... §§75-76.
        Onomatopoeic or coined words ... §§91-93.
        Allegory ... §§99-102.
        Brevity ... §§103-105.
        Epiphoneme ... §§106-111.
        Poetical color in prose ... §§112-113.

Frigidity: the related vice ... 124-126

III. The Elegant Style

Charm and gaity of expression ... §§128-172.
        Kinds of graces and their elements ... §§128-136.
        Sources of graces ... §§137-162.
                Sources in diction and composition ... §§137-155.
                Sources in subject-matter ... §§156-172.
        Differences between the ridiculous and the charming ... §§163-172.
Elegant diction, beautiful and smooth words ... §§173-178.
Elegant composition ... §§179-185.

Affected style: the related vice ... §§186-189.

IV. The Plain Style

Plain subject-matter ... §§190.
Plain diction ... §§190,191.
        Concerning clearness (also, stage-style and repetition) ... §§194 ff.
Plain composition ... §§204-208.
        Concerning vividness ... §§209-220.
        Concerning persuasiveness ... §§221-222.
        Concerning the epostolary style ... §§223-235.

Arid style: the related vice ... §§236-239.

V. The Forcible Style

Forcible subject-matter ... §§240.
Forcible composition ... §§241-271.
Forcible diction ... §§272-286.
        Concerning figured language ... §§287-298.
        Concerning hiatus in forcible passages ... §§299-300.

The graceless style: the related vice ... §§301-304.



This e-version of W. Rhys Roberts' translation of Demetrius On Style was adapted from: Demetrius On style: the Greek text of Demetrius De Elocutione edited after the Paris manuscript with introd., translation, facsimiles, etc. by W. Rhys Roberts (Cambridge, at the University Press: 1902), pp. 67-207. This is only the translation from Robert's edition, and does not include his scholarly notes or commentary. Some of Roberts' notes have been converted to in-line links and modified to reflect reference style at the Perseus Project. This e-adaptation of Roberts' translation is presented for your enjoyment as is and without any warranty by Peithô's Web.



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